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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
places in afghanistan where there are stories and continuing reports that iranian munitions and arms are arriving there. >> you are right. it is an ongoing concern. i have to put it in perspective though, because this is nothing from the weaponry coming in from iran. because if you look at that coming in from pakistan is two times less than iran. that doesn't mean it is insignificant, and we have to look for the trends in the weaponry, because if it is escalating in a major way, we have to think about responses and those could include the full range none of which are satisfying, but we may have to put more forces in the west of afghanistan and devote more afghan capability to the western border which is one of the defensive things you can do and think of some offensive actions. >> indeed. now, we are guard to pakistan, isn't withholding $800 million potentially self-injurious, because we, america, is relying on the pakistan army to fight radical islamic terrorists in their own backyard without those fund, and doesn't that stymie our attempt to fight al qaeda? >> absolutely. this is a
cuts causing a major part of our long term debts and our deficits. two wars in iraq and afghanistan that if we were to draw down earlier for example, in afghanistan would deal with long-term debt issues. so let's put those things on the table. corporate loopholes, instead of just turning to the piggy bank of social security and medicare. >> what about medicaid? would you cut that? >> medicaid, i mean, the challenge we have from medicaid is we want to make sure that we don't shift, simply shift the burden on to our states, which really can't afford that right now. again, the conversations about these entitlement programs while i find might be, you know, important for us to engage in, we're conflating apples an oranges when it comes to, one, listing our debt ceiling and dealing with major causal factors for our long-term debt. >> i'm asking about all these possible cuts, which you've rejected, because the cost of government right now is up to about 25% of our economy right now. and the revenues are about at 16%. seems to me to get 0 to some quality, raise revenues to 2022 and bring do
were killed in afghanistan and iraq. >> what were they hoping to find in hacking those calls? >> obviously, they were looking for information about families, they were looking for details about millie, did she disappear, was she with a boyfriend somewhere, so they had access. >> the number of people that had to be involved in this exercise has to be big. >> no. 2007, the managing director of "news of the world," now the director of "the wall street journal" went before a committee and said there was one rogue reporter at "news of the world." it's now emerged it was rife throughout the paper that virtually everybody involved was hacking someone's phone for stories, and that's why rupert murdoch took the decision at the weekend to close that newspaper for good. that's a newspaper that's existed for 168 years. no more. >> and the law on this in britain? >> oh, it's a criminal offense. but what's worse is it's now emerged that they had fiscal financial relationships with serving police officers, so, for example, one individual, a member of parliament was discovered to be meeting
in afghanistan, that's not going to coerce me into voting for it. on the other hand, i do think that some of the few remaining serious republicans understand that they will get blamed for this. so i think there is some pressure to do that. one other point i want to mention, rachel, which deeply angers me, these are people, the tea party people, who came to be the constitutionalists, they are in the process of launching the most fundamental assault on the american constitution, fundamental principle we have ever seen, and that was majority rule. the great breakthrough in the 18th century was self governance. and if you read the constitution, the assumption is majority rule in congress. it's majority rule in the states. in no part of the u.s. constitution are you required to get more than a simple majority of both houses to do anything. there's a 2/3 required for treaty only in the senate. that was special with foreign powers. there's a 2/3 requirement to amend the constitution or to impeach someone. but for legislation everywhere in the constitution all you need is a majority, and these pe
at a critical moment with afghanistan broke from her official duties to do a lengthy briefing of murdoch's editors from around the world. no doubt we've seen these sorts of relationships in the u.s. >> does this beg the question, though, something like what happened to "news of the world" could happen here inside the u.s.? if these tactics are being used and administered in that corporation, how come they wouldn't be used in the united states if they are so successful else where? >> well, i think we have to understand that different parts of the world have different approaches to journalism, and there's simply no doubt that the united states has different practices. for instance, we have a constitutional amendment that protects the right to privacy. it's quite engrained in our life, so i'm not sure you'll see an exact parallel, but opening up the discussion about how murdoch operates and the way murdoch's operations have grown via relationships with government is a significant thing to do. remember, rupert murdoch has aggressively lobbied the federal communications commission for a lifti
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)